Navy Zeroes Out Fire Scout Buy, Future of Program Unclear

Navy Zeroes Out Fire Scout Buy, Future of Program Unclear

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An MQ-8C Fire Scout unmanned aerial vehicle takes off from Naval Base Ventura County at Point Mugu on Oct. 31, 2013. US Navy Photo

An MQ-8C Fire Scout unmanned aerial vehicle takes off from Naval Base Ventura County at Point Mugu on Oct. 31, 2013. US Navy Photo

The Navy has abandoned its plans to buy 17 additional Northrop Grumman Fire Scout rotary wing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) for the next five years as part of its Fiscal Year 2015 budget submission. Read More

Document: Congressional Report on China Naval Modernization and Implications for U.S. Naval Forces

Document: Congressional Report on China Naval Modernization and Implications for U.S. Naval Forces

People's Liberation Army Navy carrier Liaoning.

People’s Liberation Army Navy carrier Liaoning.

The following is a from Feb. 28, 2014 report from the Congressional Research Service, China Naval Modernization: Implications for U.S. Navy Capabilities.
China is building a modern and regionally powerful Navy with a modest but growing capability for conducting operations beyond China’s near-seas region. The question of how the United States should respond to China’s military modernization effort, including its naval modernization effort, has emerged as a key issue in U.S. defense planning. The question is of particular importance to the U.S. Navy, because many U.S. military programs for countering improved Chinese military forces would fall within the Navy’s budget. Read More

New Budget Preserves Navy High End Combat Power

New Budget Preserves Navy High End Combat Power

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USS Roosevelt (DDG-80) left,the guided missile destroyer USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) and the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG-58) on Feb. 19, 2014. US Navy Photo

USS Roosevelt (DDG-80) left,the guided missile destroyer USS Arleigh Burke (DDG-51) and the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG-58) on Feb. 19, 2014. US Navy Photo

The Navy preserved development of future combat power over the next five years in its Fiscal Year 2015 $148 billion budget submission to Congress released in briefing at the Pentagon on Tuesday.

The procurement documents — released on Tuesday — emphasize weapon systems over the Future Years Defense Plan (FYDP) that will fit into future Navy constructs, like the Naval Integrated Fire Control-Counter Air—or NIFC-CA (pronounced: nif-kah) designed to prosecute high-end air wars in the 2020s as well as next generation surface ship weapons. Read More

Document: 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review

Document: 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review

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The following is from the executive summary of the 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review, released on March, 4 2014.
The United States faces a rapidly changing security environment. We are repositioning to focus on the strategic challenges and opportunities that will define our future: new technologies, new centers of power, and a world that is growing more volatile, more unpredictable, and in some instances more threatening to the United States. Read More

Planning for Joint U.S. and Russia Naval Exercise On Hold Pending Outcome in Crimea

Planning for Joint U.S. and Russia Naval Exercise On Hold Pending Outcome in Crimea

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USS Farragut (DDG-99) arrives in Severomorsk, Russia for a two-day visit after completing exercise Northern Eagle 2012. Russian Navy Photo

USS Farragut (DDG-99) arrives in Severomorsk, Russia for a two-day visit after completing exercise Northern Eagle 2012. Russian Navy Photo

Planning for the biennial Northern Eagle exercise between Russia, the U.S. and Norway has been “put on hold,” while the U.S. says troops have massed on the ground in the Crimea region of Ukraine, a military official told USNI News on Tuesday. Read More

Document: Congressional Report on Navy Littoral Combat Ship Program

Document: Congressional Report on Navy Littoral Combat Ship Program

Fort Worth (LCS-3) conducts builders trials in 2011. Lockheed Martin Photo

Fort Worth (LCS-3) conducts builders trials in 2011. Lockheed Martin Photo

The following is the Feb. 25, 2014 update on the Littoral Combat Ship program from the Congressional Research Service. 
On February 24, 2014, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel announced that the Department of Defense (DOD) intends to truncate the Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program to 32 ships— a reduction of 20 ships from the previously planned total of 52 LCSs. Through FY2014, a total of 20 LCSs have been funded. Under the Navy’s FY2014 budget submission, LCSs 21 through 24 were scheduled to be requested for procurement in FY2015. Read More