Essay: How Offering Tomahawks for Foreign Military Sales Will Strengthen Allies and Deter Adversaries

Essay: How Offering Tomahawks for Foreign Military Sales Will Strengthen Allies and Deter Adversaries

USS Barry (DDG=52) fires Tomahawk cruise missiles in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn on March 11, 2011. US Navy Photo

USS Barry (DDG=52) fires Tomahawk cruise missiles in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn on March 11, 2011. US Navy Photo

The Tomahawk Land Attack Missile (TLAM) has long been a mainstay of the U.S. strike weapon inventory. Launching from ranges out to 1,000 miles and armed with a 1,000-pound warhead, it is the Navy’s “Kick Down the Door” weapon, attacking well-defended high-value land targets. The BLK IV missile is the latest variant in a steady progression of capability, incorporating mission planning, navigation and guidance, and command and control upgrades designed to improve responsiveness and target flexibility. Combat-proven and operationally reliable, Tomahawk remains a weapon of choice for planners and commanders alike. The FY 2016 budget maintains production and inventory levels, reflecting a continued high demand signal. Read More

CNO Richardson's 2015 Thanksgiving Message

CNO Richardson’s 2015 Thanksgiving Message

141127-N-LQ926-008 SASEBO, Japan (Nov. 27, 2014) Capt. Paul C. Spedero, commanding officer of the amphibious assault ship USS Peleliu (LHA 5), carves a Thanksgiving turkey before the meal on the mess decks of Peleliu. Peleliu is on its final western Pacific deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region before decommissioning early next year. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alex Van’tLeven/Released)

Capt. Paul C. Spedero, commanding officer of the amphibious assault ship USS Peleliu (LHA-5), carves a Thanksgiving turkey before the meal on the mess decks of Peleliu on 2014. US Navy Photo

The following is Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson’s 2015 Thanksgiving message to the U.S. Navy. Read More

Canadian Participation in F-35 Program Remains Murky; U.S. Hopes for Open Competition for CF-18 Replacement

Canadian Participation in F-35 Program Remains Murky; U.S. Hopes for Open Competition for CF-18 Replacement

F-35 test pilot Maj Charles “Flak” Trickey fired the GAU-22/A 25mm gun from F-35A aircraft AF-2 in the first aerial gun test operating on the China Lake, California, test range, Oct. 30, 2015. US Air Force photo.

F-35 test pilot Maj Charles “Flak” Trickey fired the GAU-22/A 25mm gun from F-35A aircraft AF-2 in the first aerial gun test operating on the China Lake, California, test range, Oct. 30, 2015. US Air Force photo.

Canada’s participation in the global Lockheed Martin F-35 Joint Strike Fighter remains in limbo, with conflicting reports coming out of the country since the installation of a Liberal Party government following the Oct. 19 election. Read More