Category Archives: Surface Forces

Document: Report on Navy Shipboard Lasers

Document: Report on Navy Shipboard Lasers

The Laser Weapon System (LaWS) installed aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey (DDG-105) US Navy Photo

The Laser Weapon System (LaWS) installed aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey (DDG-105) US Navy Photo

The following is from the Feb. 7, 2013 Congressional Research Service report, Navy Shipboard Lasers for Surface, Air, and Missile Defense.

More powerful shipboard lasers, which could become ready for installation in subsequent years, could provide Navy surface ships with an ability to counter a wider range of surface and air targets at ranges of up to about 10 miles. These more powerful lasers might, among other things, provide Navy surface ships with a terminal-defense capability against certain ballistic missiles, including China’s new anti-ship ballistic missile (ASBM). Read More

Coast Guard Chief Papp: Service 'Shouldn't Bear Full Brunt' of New Icebreaker Cost

Coast Guard Chief Papp: Service ‘Shouldn’t Bear Full Brunt’ of New Icebreaker Cost

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Coast Guard Icebreakers Polar Star (WAGB-10) and Polar Sea (WAGB-11) moored in an undated photo.

Coast Guard Icebreakers Polar Star (WAGB-10) and Polar Sea (WAGB-11) moored in an undated photo.

The Coast Guard will likely need help from other government agencies to fund its proposed new $1 billion heavy icebreaker the service says it needs to operate in the Arctic and Antarctic, outgoing USCG commandant Adm. Robert Papp told reporters Wednesday following his final State of the Coast Guard address in Washington, D.C. Read More

Document: Congressional Report on U.S. Navy Destroyers

Document: Congressional Report on U.S. Navy Destroyers

USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) is underway in the Atlantic Ocean on Feb. 23, 2014. US Navy Photo

USS Roosevelt (DDG 80) is underway in the Atlantic Ocean on Feb. 23, 2014. US Navy Photo

The following is from the Feb. 4, 2013 Congressional Research Service report, DDG-51 and DDG-1000 Destroyer Programs: Background and Issues for Congress.  Read More

Hagel: Navy to Lay Up 11 Cruisers, Carrier Cut Decision Delayed until 2016 Budget

Hagel: Navy to Lay Up 11 Cruisers, Carrier Cut Decision Delayed until 2016 Budget

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USS Lake Erie (CG-70) operates with other cruisers off the coast of Hawaii on Jan. 27, 2014. US Navy Photo

USS Lake Erie (CG-70) operates with other cruisers off the coast of Hawaii on Jan. 27, 2014. US Navy Photo


The U.S. Navy will “lay up” half of the service’s fleet of Ticonderoga-class missile cruisers under the President’s fiscal year 2015 budget proposal.

“Half of the Navy’s cruiser fleet— or 11 ships —will be ‘laid up’ and placed in reduced operating status while they are modernized, and eventually returned to service with greater capability and a longer lifespan,” Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel told reporters during a briefing at the Pentagon on Monday.
“This approach enables us over the long-term to sustain and modernize our fleet of cruisers.” Read More

Pentagon Caps LCS at 32 Hulls, Hagel Directs Navy to Evaluate ‘Capable and Lethal’ Frigate Designs

Pentagon Caps LCS at 32 Hulls, Hagel Directs Navy to Evaluate ‘Capable and Lethal’ Frigate Designs

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USS Freedom (LCS-1), left, and USS Independence (LCS-2) in 2012. US Navy Photo

USS Freedom (LCS-1), left, and USS Independence (LCS-2) in 2012. US Navy Photo

The Pentagon will cut the final number of the Navy’s Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) by 20 — from 52 to 32 — and shortly begin a study on a new frigate for the service, Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel told reporters at a Fiscal Year 2015 Defense Department budget preview on Monday afternoon. Read More

Document: Navy's 2014 Arctic Roadmap

Document: Navy’s 2014 Arctic Roadmap

A Navy SEAL freefalls from an Austrian C-130 aircraft above the Arctic Circle in 2010. US Navy Photo

A Navy SEAL freefalls from an Austrian C-130 aircraft above the Arctic Circle in 2010. US Navy Photo

The following is from the U.S. Navy’s Arctic Roadmap: 2014-2030, released on Feb. 24, 2014.

The United States is an Arctic nation through the state of Alaska and its surrounding territorial and Exclusive Economic Zone waters located in and around the Arctic Circle. The United States Navy, as the maritime component of the Department of Defense, has global leadership responsibilities to provide ready forces for current operations and contingency response that include the Arctic Ocean. The Arctic Region remains a challenging operating environment, with a harsh climate, vast distances, and little infrastructure. These issues, coupled with limited operational experience, are just a few substantial challenges the Navy will have to overcome in the Arctic Region. While the Region is expected to remain a low threat security environment where nations resolve differences peacefully, the Navy will be prepared to prevent conflict and ensure national interests are protected. Read More

Document: Congressional Report on Navy Irregular Warfare and Counterterrorism Operations

Document: Congressional Report on Navy Irregular Warfare and Counterterrorism Operations

US Navy SEALs jump out of an SH-60 Sea Hawk helicopter during a combat rescue swimmer course. US Navy Photo

US Navy SEALs jump out of an SH-60 Sea Hawk helicopter during a combat rescue swimmer course. US Navy Photo

The following is from the Feb. 7, 2014 Congressional Research Service Report: Navy Irregular Warfare and Counterterrorism Operations.

The Navy for several years has carried out a variety of irregular warfare (IW) and counterterrorism (CT) activities. Among the most readily visible of the Navy’s recent IW operations have been those carried out by Navy sailors serving ashore in Afghanistan and Iraq. Read More

Document: Pentagon's Electromagnetic Strategy

Document: Pentagon’s Electromagnetic Strategy

140206-N-UD469-009The following is the recently released Pentagon Electromagnetic Spectrum Strategy.
Electromagnetic spectrum (EMS) access is a prerequisite for modern military operations. DoD’s growing requirements to gather, analyze, and share information rapidly; to control an increasing number of automated Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) assets; to command geographically dispersed and mobile forces to gain access into denied areas; and to “train as we fight” requires that DoD maintain sufficient spectrum access. Read More

Amphib Leaves San Diego for NASA Recovery Test

Amphib Leaves San Diego for NASA Recovery Test

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Sailors assigned to the amphibious transport dock ship USS Arlington (LPD 24) recover an Orion capsule into the well deck of Arlington. US Navy Photo

Sailors assigned to the amphibious transport dock ship USS Arlington (LPD 24) recover an Orion capsule into the well deck of Arlington. US Navy Photo

Amphibious warship USS San Diego (LPD-22) left Naval Station San Diego, Calif. on Tuesday for an open ocean recovery test of NASA’s planned new Orion space capsule. Read More