Category Archives: Military Personnel

The John Walker Spy Ring and The U.S. Navy's Biggest Betrayal

The John Walker Spy Ring and The U.S. Navy’s Biggest Betrayal

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US Naval Institute Photo Illustration

US Naval Institute Photo Illustration

Notorious spy John Walker died on Aug. 28, 2014. The following is a story outlining Walker’s spy ring from the June 2010 issue of U.S. Naval Institute’s Naval History Magazine with the original title: The Navy’s Biggest Betrayal.

Twenty-five years ago the FBI finally shut off the biggest espionage leak in U.S. Navy history when it arrested former senior warrant officer John A. Walker. Read More

Russia, Baltic Security and Ukraine Will Likely Dominate Upcoming NATO Summit

Russia, Baltic Security and Ukraine Will Likely Dominate Upcoming NATO Summit

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Estonian troops conduct a march past during the Opening Ceremony for Ex STEADFAST JAZZ on the Drawsko Pomorskie Training Area, Poland, on Nov. 3, 2013. NATO Photo

Estonian troops conduct a march past during the Opening Ceremony for Ex STEADFAST JAZZ on the Drawsko Pomorskie Training Area, Poland, on Nov. 3, 2013. NATO Photo

Even though expansion of its role is not on the agenda for NATO’s upcoming meeting, the future of the Baltic states, the continuing crisis in Ukraine and the turmoil over who will be the next president of Afghanistan will overshadow the meeting. Read More

Navy Expels 34 Sailors in Nuclear Cheating Scandal

Navy Expels 34 Sailors in Nuclear Cheating Scandal

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moored training ship Daniel Webster (MTS-626) begins its tow from Norfolk Naval Shipyard to Charleston, S.C. on 21 August 2012. US Navy Photo

The moored training ship Daniel Webster (MTS-626) begins its tow from Norfolk Naval Shipyard to Charleston, S.C. on 21 August 2012. More than 70 sailors assigned to the training ship had cheated on engineering watch stander exams. US Navy Photo

A Navy investigation of a seven-year long cheating ring in one of its most renowned training schools has resulted in the expulsion of 34 sailors from the Navy and another 10 sailors remain under investigation, the service announced today. Read More

The Legacy of USS Indianapolis

The Legacy of USS Indianapolis

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USS Indianapolis in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii in 1937. US Navy Photo

USS Indianapolis in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii in 1937. US Navy Photo

The following is a 1999 article from Proceedings, originally titled: The Sinking of the Indy & Responsibility of Command.

The July 30, 1945 sinking of the heavy cruiser USS Indianapolis (CA-35) by the Imperial Japanese submarine 1-58 has been called the last, great naval tragedy of World War II. It is the stuff of legend: after delivering the atomic bombs to Tinian, the Indy was torpedoed, sinking in 12 minutes. At least 800 crew members survived the sinking and went into the water. On their rescue after five days, only 320 still were alive. Their stories have inspired three books, a movie, and perhaps yet another feature film.  Read More

Navigating Ukraine’s Civil War

Navigating Ukraine’s Civil War

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Pro-Russian separatists at a check point in Kharkiv in Eastern Ukraine.

Pro-Russian separatists at a check point in Kharkiv in Eastern Ukraine.

As summer rolls on, Russian-built anti-aircraft missiles continue to down aircraft over eastern Ukraine. While a great deal of ink has been spilled over exactly what kind of missiles are deployed, and who is giving the launch authorizations and actually launching them, one fact is salient: This is an escalation, intentional or not, that elevates the simmering Ukrainian civil war beyond Donetsk. Read More

Opinion: The Legacy of Adm. William McRaven

Opinion: The Legacy of Adm. William McRaven

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Adm. William H. McRaven, the outgoing U.S. Special Operations Command, addresses the audience during the USSOCOM change of commander ceremony at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla. in 2011. DoD Photo

Adm. William McRaven, the outgoing U.S. Special Operations Command, addresses the audience during the USSOCOM change of commander ceremony at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla. in 2011. DoD Photo

Now that Adm. William McRaven has announced his retirement, it is worth looking back at the contributions of perhaps the most influential Navy flag officer since Fleet Adm. Chester Nimitz. Read More