John Grady

About John Grady

John Grady, a former managing editor of Navy Times, retired as director of communications for the Association of the United States Army. His reporting on national defense and national security has appeared on Breaking Defense, GovExec.com, NextGov.com, DefenseOne.com, Government Executive and USNI News.


Recent Posts By the Author


Expert: Navy Should Revise Outer Air Battle Concept

Expert: Navy Should Revise Outer Air Battle Concept

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USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) launches a Standard Missile-6 (SM-6) during a live-fire test of the ship's aegis weapons system on June, 19 2014. US Navy Photo

USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) launches a Standard Missile-6 (SM-6) during a live-fire test of the ship’s aegis weapons system on June, 19 2014. US Navy Photo

WASHINGTON, D.C. — One way to restore offensive punch to the surface Navy is to discard the idea of Outer Air Battle to defeat a Soviet Cold War fleet in the Mediterranean and Baltic Seas and the North Atlantic and concentrate on dense air defenses 30 nautical miles out. Read More

CSBA Recommends New Course for U.S. Navy Surface Forces

CSBA Recommends New Course for U.S. Navy Surface Forces

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Sailors man the phone and distance line aboard the Arleigh Burke-Class guided-missile destroyer USS Mitscher (DDG-57) on Nov. 7, 2014. US Navy Photo

Sailors man the phone and distance line aboard the Arleigh Burke-Class guided-missile destroyer USS Mitscher (DDG-57) on Nov. 7, 2014. US Navy Photo

The Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments (CSBA) unveiled a plan on Monday that promises to squeeze the most out of the U.S. Navy’s existing surface assets — between now and 2025 when the Navy’s shipbuilding budget will be hard pressed by the Ohio-class replacement program’s (ORP) — while at the same time promising new capabilities such as lasers and modifying existing systems like air defense missiles to increase range and also be used for strike, the report’s author told reporters at a briefing on Monday. Read More

Panel: U.S. and China Differ On Standards of Transparency

Panel: U.S. and China Differ On Standards of Transparency

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Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert departs the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) ship Datong FFG 580 on July 17, 2014. US Navy Photo

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Jonathan Greenert departs the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) ship Datong FFG 580 on July 17, 2014. US Navy Photo

The United States and China, “are operating on two different playing fields” when it comes to transparency of their military activities and intentions in the Pacific, a former senior State Department official told a security forum at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) think tank on Wednesday. Read More

Iran Slowing Cooperation With Nuclear Monitors

Iran Slowing Cooperation With Nuclear Monitors

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An undated photo of the reactor building of Iran’s Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant. Iranian Students News Agency photo

An undated photo of the reactor building of Iran’s Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant. Iranian Students News Agency photo

Iran has slowed its cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency since this summer and is not providing assurance that all its nuclear material is being used for peaceful purposes. Read More

Panel: China Expanding Submarine Capabilities

Panel: China Expanding Submarine Capabilities

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People's Liberation Army Navy Type-92 submarine. PLAN Photo

People’s Liberation Army Navy Type-92 submarine. PLAN Photo

China is constantly improving underwater operations and investments in platforms, sensors, and even oceanographic research, said Thomas Mahnken of Johns Hopkins School of Advance and International Studies during a Monday panel at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C. Read More

Former U.S. Commander in Korea: North Korea Could Use More Than Missiles to Deploy Nuclear Weapons

Former U.S. Commander in Korea: North Korea Could Use More Than Missiles to Deploy Nuclear Weapons

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2012 North Korean missile test.

2012 North Korean missile test.

While the United States, Republic of Korea and Japan speak often about the nuclear missile threat posed by North Korea to all three nations, the former commander of the combined forces on the Korean peninsula said the allies may be missing a very real, but less thought about dangers. “The best way to deliver a nuclear weapon to Seoul” could be “a rickety old wooden airplane,” or a drone or a ship pulling into a nearby harbor. Read More