About Fred Schultz

Fred Schultz is the Managing Editor for U.S. Naval Institute’s Proceedings.


Recent Posts By the Author


Ben Bradlee's Life in the Navy

Ben Bradlee’s Life in the Navy

By:
Ben Bradlee. Photo via BBC

Ben Bradlee. Photo via BBC

Ben Bradlee, the former executive editor of The Washington Post, died on Tuesday. He was 93. Bradley was best known for leading the Post during the paper’s investigation into the break in at the Watergate Hotel by members of the Nixon administration and the subsequent political fallout. Bradlee also served as a naval officer in the Pacific during World War II and detailed his experience in his 1995 memoir, A Good Life.
The following is an interview Bradlee conducted with Naval History magazine in the December 1995 issue originally titled, “That’s What Editors Do.”
Read More

Proceedings: Naval Institute at 140

Proceedings: Naval Institute at 140

By:
U.S. Naval Institute contributors clockwise from top right: W.S. Sims, William F. Halsey, Hyman Rickover, Ernest J. King and Alfred Thayer Mahan. Illustration by Tom W. Freeman

U.S. Naval Institute contributors clockwise from top right: W.S. Sims, William F. Halsey, Hyman Rickover, Ernest J. King and Alfred Thayer Mahan. Illustration by Tom W. Freeman

Sometimes in the throes of the monthly and bimonthly Proceedings and Naval History deadlines we lose sight of just how much bigger the U.S. Naval Institute is than any or all of us. And the 15 founding members who convened on the evening of 9 October 1873 by the light of oil lamps in the U.S. Naval Academy’s Department of Physics and Chemistry building probably had no idea that the organization would ever be as influential and relevant as it is today. Read More

NOAA's James Delgado on Burial of USS Monitor Sailors

NOAA’s James Delgado on Burial of USS Monitor Sailors

By:
James Delgado

James Delgado

The Director of Maritime Heritage for the National Marine Sanctuaries Program at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, James Delgado is also the author of some 16 books and hundreds of articles on sea exploration and underwater archaeology. On the day of the interment at Arlington National Cemetery of remains from two crewmen who perished when the USS Monitor sank off Cape Hatteras in 1862, Delgado spoke with Proceedings Managing Editor Fred Schultz. Read More

Exclusive: USNI Interview with Kathryn Bigelow

Exclusive: USNI Interview with Kathryn Bigelow

By:
Kathryn Bigelow's film 'Zero Dark Thirty' is nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award.

Kathryn Bigelow’s film ‘Zero Dark Thirty’ is nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award.

She’s the director of “Zero Dark Thirty”—the controversial motion picture detailing how U.S. Navy SEALs took down Osama bin Laden—which is up for several Academy Awards on Sunday, 24 February. Her film, “The Hurt Locker,” won her the 2009 Academy Award for Best Director and was voted the year’s Best Picture, along with receiving four other awards. At the height of Oscar Week, Proceedings Managing Editor Fred Schultz had the opportunity to pose a few questions to Kathryn Bigelow. Read More

Sebastian Junger: Tim Hetherington Didn't Have to Die

Sebastian Junger: Tim Hetherington Didn’t Have to Die

By:

U.S. Naval Institute’s Fred Schultz spoke with journalist and documentary filmmaker Sebastian Junger on Sept. 24 about Junger’s new organization dedicated to providing basic medical training to freelance frontline war reporters and photographers.

Junger created Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues following the 2011 death of photographer Tim Hetherington in Libya.
Hetherington was wounded by mortar fire while covering the conflict in Libya and died on the way to a local hospital. Junger said if fellow journalists on the scene were trained in basic first aid, Hetherington could have survived.

RISC has conducted its first intensive training session in April and his preparing for a second in New York.

Junger also discussed his view on the U.S. Afghanistan pullout and his responsibility for helping make the term “The Perfect Storm,” one of the most overused clichés in the last twenty years.