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Document: The Navy’s New Deployment Plan

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Sailors man a hose during a general quarters drill in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) on Jan. 14, 2014. US Navy Photo

Sailors man a hose during a general quarters drill in the hangar bay of the aircraft carrier USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) on Jan. 14, 2014. US Navy Photo

The following is a detailed outline of U.S. Fleet Forces new Optimized Fleet Response Plan (O-FRP). Beginning with the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75), the navy will schedule maintenance and deployments in a new scheme centred around the carrier strike group.

  • The Optimized Fleet Response Plan (O-FRP) has been developed to enhance the stability and predictability for our Sailors and families by aligning carrier strike group assets to a new 36 month training and deployment cycle.
  • Beginning in fiscal year ’15, all required maintenance, training, evaluations and a single eight-month deployment will be efficiently scheduled throughout the cycle in such a manner to drive down costs and increase overall fleet readiness.
  • Under this plan, we will streamline the inspection and evaluation process and ensure that we are able to maintain a level of surge capacity.
  • O-FRP reduces time at sea and increases home port tempo from 49% to 68% for our Sailors over the 36 month period. Initially focused on Carrier Strike Groups, O-FRP will ultimately be designed for all U.S Navy assets from the ARG/MEU to submarines and expeditionary forces.

  • Tony

    During the Cold War we learned that we could sustain a maintenance-training-deployment-overhaul cycle that had 6-month deployments indefinitely, that did not have an adverse effect on retention. Unfortunately, GCC requirements did not go down commensurate with what we could afford, so we cut spare parts in the 90’s (after we moved to the SRA maintenance model in the 80’s with the advent of the gas-turbine powered ships, which I am also not a fan of) to save money and maintain as many ships as possible. 9/11 totally blew up deployment planning, and we adopted FRP. We will continue to beat the heck out of our ships and crews until GCC requirements are in line with force structure and budgets, and they have NOT been in alignment since the end of the Cold War. One can argue all day/week/month as to which of the three legs of the stool is not the appropriate length, but the fact is that they are not…

    • David

      Well put Tony. Additionally missing in the discussion is the ‘oops, we didn’t really mean to have this many active duty personnel, we can’t afford the cost of that’ mindset in regards to retroactively changing benefits (retired pay/commissaries/tricare).